Intimacy God With Brokenness


by Pastor Joby C. Soriano (from http://www.ccf-alabang.org)

We sometimes ask, “Why does a good God allow bad things to happen to good people?” However, when we are the person who is suffering, the question changes! Our pain and suffering forces us to ask more personal questions like, “Does my God really care when bad things happen to me? Does He still love me? Does God have any idea how much I’m hurting? The answer, of course, is an absolute “Yes” to all of those questions! Our Almighty God does, in fact, care when bad things happen to us. He does, in fact, still love us. He sees and feel our pain and suffering. He has not forgotten us and He knows more about suffering than we could ever hope to imagine!

You see God uses brokenness to build our intimacy with Him. If we want to experience real intimacy with God we must experience brokenness.  Here are three important things to consider about intimacy with God in brokenness.

1. The Reality of Brokenness

Psalm 31:12 says, “I am forgotten as a dead man out of mind: I am like a broken vessel.” When a person is broken, he is almost useless, unless he gets repaired. We can reject the discipline, complain about our pain, become bitter and arrogantly justify ourselves before God and others. We can stubbornly refuse to bend, to bow or to be broken. The most common response is to become downcast, depressed, feeling worthless and washed-up, and even quit. We take out our bitterness over what is happening to us on to those around us. We develop a short fuse, we say things that we don’t really mean, and we lose control of our emotions very easily. Some of us blame God for what has happened and either drop out of church or quit serving like we used to and become discouraged, disillusioned, and even depressed.

2. The Reason for Brokenness

Sometimes God sees that our life is a mess and He breaks us so that He can remake us. If we aren’t broken, we cannot be fixed. God wants us broken, so He can put us back together again to mold us and shape us into the image and likeness of Christ. “For momentary, light affliction is producing for us an eternal weight of glory far beyond all comparison,” 2 Corinthians 4:17

3. The Remedy for Brokenness

David tells us the remedy for brokenness in Psalm 51:17, “The sacrifice God wants is a broken spirit. God, you will not reject a heart that is broken and sorry for sin.” David recognized that God didn’t want the ritual of sacrifice. God wanted his crushed heart, his broken spirit, and the very center of David’s being. God wanted a repentant heart.

Humility is the remedy for brokenness that is an essential prerequisite for real intimacy with God. Take the life of Moses. God took Moses through a process of disappointment and disillusionment that resulted in brokenness. Because Moses was broken, God could invest him with spiritual authority and commission him to do an impossible task. Because Moses was broken, he experienced intimacy and communion with God. He learned God’s will for his life and for the people of God.

The apostle Paul said in 2 Corinthians 4:7, “But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, so that the surpassing greatness of the power will be of God and not from ourselves.” We are the clay jars. Sometimes we want to decorate and beautify the clay pots, thinking we can attract people and change people because we are so attractive. But God has another idea. The treasure is Jesus, not the pot. And the attraction is the treasure of the life of Jesus, not the clay pot. So God has to crack the pot in order for the treasure to be revealed.

Think about it, our Lord was broken in a different way, but through His brokenness, the greatest blessing of them all – salvation, was made available for mankind.

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